Play it again, Sam 13 December 2019 Sam Harrison returns to the floor at Hammersmith’s Riverside Studios, where his brasserie is set to be a blockbuster
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Extracts from Caterer's archives

01 January 2000
Extracts from Caterer's archives

The sixties

The idea of a uniform system of tipping throughout Britain's hotel and catering industry was given unanimous approval by employers, staff and customers at a top-level meeting in London last week. But the problem remains - which system?

The meeting was called, as reported last week, by the Hotel & Catering Little Neddy as part of its inquiry into tipping, with the object of testing the feelings of everybody concerned. It was attended by representatives of hotel and catering associations, professional organisations, trade unions, motoring organisations and consumers' associations.

The meeting agreed that the intention should be to encourage hotels and restaurants to adopt one of three practices and to inform customers accordingly. They are:

  • No service charge, and customers informed that tips are not expected and are actively discouraged;

  • A service charge made and customers informed that tips are not expected and are actively discouraged;

  • No service charge but tipping practised.

Caterer, 1 August 1968

The seventies

London hotels may be asked to tie up to a central computer which would show how many bedspaces were available in the capital at any given time.

The London Tourist Board and the British Tourist Authority are investigating the possibility of a computerised hotel accommodation service, partly to avoid any repetition of "fully booked" when in fact there have been rooms available.

The computer plan was announced last week at the LTB's annual general meeting by the board chairman, Lord Ponsonby.

Caterer, 27 July 1978

The eighties

Research by the Hotel & Catering Training Board confirms fears that the industry faces a serious staffing crisis.

The research, due to be published in September, says employment demands have been increasing for the past five years and are set to rocket in the next five years.

The HCTB forecasts that, given optimum growth, restaurants will need 33% more staff by 1993, pubs 13%, clubs 19%, contract caterers 18% and hotels 21%.

The board says recruitment difficulties will escalate by 1995, when it is predicted that there will be one million fewer school-leavers.

Caterer, 28 July 1988

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