There will be far fewer British peas to go around for the end of 2012 and into 2013, according to the British Growers Association.

The shortage is a result of drought conditions earlier this year followed by the record rainfall in April and June, severely reducing the prospects of this year's British crop.

British shoppers enjoy 150 million kg of frozen peas every year, worth over £200m at retail prices. More than 90% of these are grown in the UK.

James Hallett, chief executive of the British Growers' Association, said: "Because the pea harvest is so short, the UK's experienced growers are able to predict the final crop size with a high degree of accuracy.

"Many British growers are forecasting at least a 40% drop in their harvest after a really tough summer, a potential reduction in retail sales of up to £80m. We are already seeing low-grade, poor-quality Spanish peas coming into the UK as a result."

As we near the mid-point of the short 10-week pea harvest, it is clear that the decrease in crop yield may affect prices.

The British Growers' Association represents and provides support services to British growers and specialist crop associations.

By Lisa Jenkins

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