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Storms lead to sharp rise in price of fish and chips

21 February 2014 by
Storms lead to sharp rise in price of fish and chips

The wholesale price of fish has gone up by more than 40% following the recent storms, which have prevented fishing boats sailing around the UK coast.

As a result, customers are paying 10% or 35p more for their portion of fish and chips, according to the Daily Mail.

Haddock, plaice and whiting caught in the Atlantic Ocean have shot up in price, while other species of fish have been difficult to catch.

Jonathan Adams, president of the National Federation of Fishmongers, said the price of fish is always affected by the weather.

"When it goes up, consumers must expect to pay as much as 10% more. Obviously not many people who do fish and chips actually use fresh fish any more, but those who do will have probably had an increase of about £3 per kilo.

"That would probably work out at about an extra 35p per portion of fish.

Fishmonger Malcom Smith added: "Usually fishing boats go out for five to seven days, but they have only been able to get out for a day or two because of the bad weather down in Cornwall and Devon."

"Prices can fluctuate by up to 35% in just seven days, but we try to even out the prices throughout the year so we don't shock the customers.

"The prices are starting to come down again now because there are more fish in the system. Things will improve week on week."

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