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Marcus Wareing admits blame in rupture with Gordon Ramsay – For more hospitality stories, see what the weekend papers say

03 August 2009 by
Marcus Wareing admits blame in rupture with Gordon Ramsay – For more hospitality stories, see what the weekend papers say

Marcus Wareing admits blame in rupture with Gordon Ramsay
Michelin-starred chef Marcus Wareing has admitted that he was more to blame than his former mentor Gordon Ramsay for the acrimonious split that saw Wareing take over the lease of the former Pétrus at the Berkeley hotel but Ramsay retain the nameRead the full article in the Sunday Times >>

Rocco Forte Collection to open £120m golf resort this week
This week sees the opening of Sir Rocco Forte's first golf resort, seven years after conception and a long bureaucratic battle. The £120m Verdura Golf & Spa Resort in Sicily will become the 13th property in the Rocco Forte Collection of luxury, international hotels and Sir Rocco is hoping it will help boost turnover from £165m to £195m. The 230-hectare resort has 203 hotel bedrooms, four restaurants, a 4,000 square metre spa and 1.8 km of private coastline, "I have always wanted to do a major golf resort," said Sir Rocco. "I don't think there is anywhere in Europe that does it well.". 2 August, Read the full article in the Sunday Times >>
Aberdeen takeaway owner sued over Earl of Sandwich trademark
The owner of a small Aberdeen takeaway, the Earl of Sandwich, has been threatened with legal action by agents of the present, and 11th, Earl of Sandwich, for infringing the trademark of the family's US food chain which they plan to launch in the UK and Europe. The snack is claimed to have been invented in 1762 by John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, to sustain him at the gaming table. The Aberdeen outlet, which has been in business since 2002, was acquired by Neil Corall two years ago. Faced with demands for £3,500 in damages and costs, Corall elected to change its name to E.A.R.L. "The Earl of Sandwich was launched in the US and has been there for a number of years," said a representative for the US firm. "We now have plans to launch in the UK and Europe and we have trademarks both in the name Lord Sandwich and the Earl of Sandwich in relation to various things, in particular sandwiches and the provision of sandwiches. - 31 July, Read the full article in The Times >>

Butlins to open £20m luxury hotel Holiday parks operator Butlins is to open a £20m luxury spa hotel at its flagship Bognor Regis resort in mid-August. The 200-bedroom Ocean hotel -which will feature private balconies, mood lighting and rainfall shower - will charge a family of four £480 for three nights, compared with deals as low as £18 per head per night in Butlins' standard accommodation. The group, owned by Bourne Leisure, has spent £100m improving the standard of its accommodation in the past six years, and this move upmarket is a bid to widen its appeal as more families opt to holiday in the UK. According to Butlins managing director Richard Bates, bookings at its resorts have risen 23% year-on-year and are strong for the Ocean hotel. - 2 August, Read the full article in the Sunday Express >>

Crieff Hydro hotel settles with parents of injured toddler
A four-star hotel that advertises itself as Scotland's most child-friendly has agreed an out-of-court payment to the parents of a three-year-old toddler who claim she was left scarred after she fell at the Perthshire hotel and cut open her chin in May 2008. The family of Sheonaidh Nisbet, who were seeking £4,000, claimed the Crieff Hydro hotel had failed in its duty of care to residents. The court writ said the child had fallen onto a protruding metal water service cover in the grass outside the hotel's Brasserie restaurant and that there had been no warning that it was there. Father William Nisbet, from Kennoway in Fife, also accused the hotel of a lack of concern following the injury. The hotel is believed to have paid out around £2,500. - 31 July, Read the full article on BBC News >>

Food historian claims the English, not the Scots, invented haggis
Haggis, the iconic Scottish dish of oatmeal, liver, heart and lungs made famous by poet Robert Burns in 1786 was, in fact, invented by the English, according to food historian Catherine Brown. She says the first reference to haggis is found in an English recipe book, The English Hus-wife by Gervase Markham, which is dated 1615 (171 years before Burns wrote his Address to a Haggis) and reveals it was then popular south of the border. Brown, who also believes the word haggis to be of English origin, says the first reference in Scotland does not appear until 1747. She believes Scottish nationalists hijacked the dish as a symbol of Scottish nationhood after the treaty of union in the 18th century, and that Burns seized upon haggis as a thrifty counterbalance to the elaborate and pretentious French cuisine then popular in Edinburgh. Her findings will be broadcast on STV at 9pm on Thursday. - 2 August, Read the full article in the Sunday Times >>

By Angela Frewin

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