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Hotel prices increase by up to 190% for Wimbledon Tennis Championships

18 June 2013 by
Hotel prices increase by up to 190% for Wimbledon Tennis Championships

Hotels in and around Wimbledon have raised their prices by an average of 70% during the tennis championships which starts next week, according to the latest Hotel Price Index from the Trivago comparison website.

One night during the tournament, which runs from Monday 24 June to Sunday 7 July, will cost an average of £322 in the area directly surrounding Wimbledon, compared to £190 the preceding week. The most expensive day to book is Tuesday 25 June, when hotel prices are up by 190% to an average of £550 for one night.

The dramatic increases currently only apply to the immediate area around Wimbledon with prices across London rising by just 9% during Wimbledon fortnight, from an average of £200 per nightthe previous week to an average of £217 during the championships.

Meanwhile, UK hotel prices across the UK for this month have increased by up to 19%, year-on-year, compared to June 2012. The most significant increases can be found in Sheffield (up 19% to an average of £80 per night), Manchester (up 16% to £113), Birmingham (up 14% to £75), Cardiff (up 13% to £96) and Glasgow (up 10% to £88). Hotel prices in many of these locations have also increased in comparison to last month.

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